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Jan 15 2020

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Ohio state capital city

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Ohio House of Representatives

What you will find on this page

This page contains information on the Ohio House of Representatives that is curated and updated by Ballotpedia staff. Click on the arrows (▼) below for information and research on party control, elections, members, legislation, sessions, procedures, committees, and districts.

Party Control: current and historical information on party control of the Ohio House of Representatives

Party control

Current partisan control

The table below shows the partisan breakdown of the Ohio House of Representatives as of April 2019:

History of partisan control

Between 1992 and 2016, partisan control of the Ohio House of Representatives shifted in favor of the Republican Party. As a result of the 1992 elections, Democrats held a 53-46 majority. After the 2016 elections, Republicans would maintain a 66-33 majority. The table below shows the partisan history of the Ohio House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2016. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin’s Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

Ohio House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2016

There were three significant changes to the partisan balance of the state House between 1992 and 2016. The first was in 1994, when Republicans picked up 10 seats and gained control of the chamber. Between 2002 and 2008, Democrats went from being a 37-62 minority to holding a 53-46 majority. That Democratic majority ended as a result of the 2010 elections, when Republicans gained 13 seats and retook control of the chamber.

Republicans expanded their majorities between 2010 and 2016. As a result of the 2016 elections, Republicans held a 66-33 majority, up from the 59-40 majority the GOP gained in 2010. Most of the Republicans’ gains between 2010 and 2016 occurred as a result of the 2014 elections, when they gained five seats.

Trifecta history

A state government trifecta is a term that describes single party government, when one political party holds the governor’s office and has majorities in both chambers of the legislature in a state government. Republicans in Ohio gained a state government trifecta as a result of the 2010 elections by taking control of the state House and governorship. The table below shows state government trifectas in Ohio from 1992 to 2019.

Ohio Party Control: 1992-2019
No Democratic trifectas • 21 years of Republican trifectas

Elections: election data from 2000 to the present

Elections by year

Ohio state representatives serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years. Ohio holds elections for its legislature in even years.

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives took place in 2018. The primary election took place on May 8, 2018, and the general election was held on November 6, 2018. The filing deadline for partisan candidates was February 7, 2018. The filing deadline for independent candidates was May 7, 2018.

Elections for the Ohio House of Representatives took place in 2016. The primary election was held on March 15, 2016, and the general election was held on November 8, 2016. The candidate filing deadline was December 16, 2015. All 99 seats in the Ohio House of Representatives were up for election in 2016.

Heading into the election, Republicans held a 64-34 majority with one vacancy. Republicans gained two seats in the election, giving them a 66-33 majority.

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives took place in 2014. A primary election took place on May 6, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was February 5, 2014.

Heading into the election, Republicans held a 60-38 majority with one vacancy. Republicans gained five seats in the election, giving them a 65-34 majority.

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives took place in 2012. The primary election was held on March 6, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was December 7, 2011. All 99 seats were up for election.

Heading into the election, Republicans held a 59-40 majority. Republicans gained one seat in the election, giving them a 60-39 majority.

During the 2012 election, the total value of contributions to the 249 House candidates was $31,544,152. The top 10 contributors were: [1]

The following table details the 10 districts with the smallest margin of victory in the November 6 general election.

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives took place in 2010. The primary election was held on May 4, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was February 18, 2010. All 99 seats were up for election.

Heading into the election, Democrats held a 53-46 majority. Democrats lost 13 seats in the election, giving Republicans a 59-40 majority.

During the 2010 election, the total value of contributions to the 301 House candidates was $35,860,365. The top 10 contributors were: [2]

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives consisted of a primary election on March 4, 2008, and a general election on November 4, 2008. All 99 seats were up for election.

During the 2008 election, the total value of contributions to the 247 House candidates was $34,867,032. The top 10 contributors were: [3]

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives consisted of a primary election on May 2, 2006, and a general election on November 7, 2006. All 99 seats were up for election.

During the 2006 election, the total value of contributions to the 268 House candidates was $25,357,717. The top 10 contributors were: [4]

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives consisted of a primary election on March 2, 2004, and a general election on November 2, 2004. All 99 seats were up for election.

During the 2004 election, the total value of contributions to the 236 House candidates was $17,650,366. The top 10 contributors were: [5]

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives consisted of a primary election on May 7, 2002, and a general election on November 5, 2002. All 99 seats were up for election.

During the 2002 election, the total value of contributions to the 250 House candidates was $16,763,809. The top 10 contributors were: [6]

Elections for the office of Ohio House of Representatives consisted of a primary election on March 7, 2000, and a general election on November 7, 2000. All 99 seats were up for election.

During the 2000 election, the total value of contributions to the 286 House candidates was $18,259,570. The top 10 contributors were: [7]

Members: current leadership and membership list and information on salaries and qualifications

Leadership

The speaker of the House is the presiding officer of the body and is elected by all members. Duties of the speaker include appointing the members and chairpersons of all committees, directing the legislative procedures and presiding over daily House sessions. In the absence of the speaker, the speaker pro tempore assumes the duties of the office. [8]

Current leadership and members

  • Speaker of the House:Larry Householder (R)
  • Majority leader:Bill Seitz (R)
  • Minority leader:Fred Strahorn (D)

When sworn in

Ohio legislators assume office January 1st.

Membership qualifications

Article 2, Section 3 of the Ohio Constitution states: “Senators and representatives shall have resided in their respective districts one year next preceding their election, unless they shall have been absent on the public business of the United States, or of this state.”

Article 2, Section 5 of the Ohio Constitution states: “No person hereafter convicted of an embezzlement of the public funds, shall hold any office in this state; nor shall any person, holding public money for disbursement, or otherwise, have a seat in the General Assembly, until he shall have accounted for, and paid such money into the treasury.”

Legislation: all legislation passed by the chamber in the current or most recent legislative session

Legislation

The legislation tracker below displays all legislation that the Ohio House of Representatives has approved in its most recent legislative session—this includes legislation that has been sent from the House to the Senate and legislation that has already been approved by both chambers and signed by the governor. Information on legislation provided below includes the bill number, its name, progress, most recent action date, and sponsor. The tracker is fully interactive. Scroll up and down and side to side to see more. Click the bill number to read its text in full and see its voting history. You can click the headings to sort the content in the column. You can also rearrange the order of the headings by clicking and dragging them. Finally, in the bottom-left corner of the tracker is a magnifying glass, which, when clicked, will allow you to search for specific terms. The legislation tracker is maintained and updated by BillTrack50.

Sessions: legislative sessions dates, special sessions, and key events

About legislative sessions in Ohio

The Tenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution declares that any power not already given to the federal government is reserved to the states and the people. [9] State governments across the country use this authority to hold legislative sessions where a state’s elected representatives meet for a period of time to draft and vote on legislation and set state policies on issues such as taxation, education, and government spending. The different types of legislation passed by a legislature may include resolutions, legislatively referred constitutional amendments, and bills that become law.

Article II of the Ohio Constitution establishes when the Ohio General Assembly, of which the House of Representatives is a part, is to meet. Section 8 of Article II states that the regular session is to convene on the first Monday in January of each year, or the following day if that Monday is a legal holiday.

Section 8 also contains rules for convening special sessions of the General Assembly. It empowers the Governor of Ohio or the presiding officers of the General Assembly to convene a special session. For the presiding officers to convene the session, they must act jointly.

Dates of legislative sessions in Ohio by year

In 2019, the legislature will be in session from January 7, 2019, through December 31, 2019.

In 2018, the legislature was in session from January 2, 2018, through December 31, 2018. To read about notable events and legislation from this session, click here.

In 2017, the legislature was in session from January 2, 2017, through December 31, 2017.

In 2016, the legislature was in session from January 5 through December 31.

Major issues

Major issues during the 2016 legislative session included legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, anti-abortion legislation, renewable-energy mandates, congressional redistricting, and right-to-work bills. [10]

In 2015, the legislature was in session from January 5 through December 16. [11]

Major issues

Major issues during the 2015 legislative session included raising the minimum wage, expanding Medicaid eligibility, and increase accountability for charter schools. [12]

In 2014, the legislature was in session from January 7 through December 31.

Major issues

Major issues during the 2014 legislative session included raising taxes on gas and oil drilling, reforming Ohio’s municipal income tax system, changing the state’s election and concealed-weapons laws, and reforming Medicaid and other health-care issues. Both chambers also looked to reduce the state’s energy efficiency and renewable energy mandates. [13]

In 2013, the legislature was in session from January 7 to December 31.

Major issues

Keith Faber (R) took over as president of the Senate and the main focus of the legislature was adopting a new biennial state budget. Additionally, lawmakers addressed casino regulation, state collective-bargaining laws, Medicare expansion, and prison overcrowding. [14]

In 2012, the legislature was in session from January 3 to December 31.

In 2011, the legislature was in session from January 3 through December 31. [15]

In 2010, the legislature was in session from January 4 through December 31. [16]

Procedures: rules and procedures for veto overrides, the budget, term limits, and vacancies

Procedures

Every state legislature throughout the country features it own internal procedures that it uses to govern itself and how it interacts with other parts of state government. Ballotpedia’s coverage of internal state legislative procedures includes veto overrides, the role of the legislature in the state budget, procedures for filling membership vacancies, and procedures for filling membership vacancies.

Veto overrides

State legislatures can override governors’ vetoes. Depending on the state, this can be done during the regular legislative session, in a special session following the adjournment of the regular session, or during the next legislative session. The rules for legislative overrides of gubernatorial vetoes in Ohio are listed below.

How many legislators are required to vote for an override? Three-fifths of members in both chambers.

Are there other special rules?

Role in state budget

The state operates on a biennial budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows: [18] [19]

  1. Budget instruction guidelines are sent to state agencies in July of the year preceding the start of the new biennium.
  2. State agencies submit their requests to the governor in September and October.
  3. Agency hearings are held in October and November.
  4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the state legislature in February (this deadline is extended to mid-March for a newly-elected governor).
  5. The legislature typically adopts a budget in June. A simple majority is required to pass a budget. The biennium begins July 1 of odd-numbered years.

Ohio is one of 44 states in which the governor has line item veto authority. [19]

The governor is legally required to submit a balanced budget proposal. Likewise, the state legislature is legally required to pass a balanced budget. [19]

If there is a vacancy in the Ohio General Assembly, the vacancy must be filled by an election conducted by the members of the legislative house where the vacancy happened. Also, the election can only be conducted by the same members of the political party that last held the seat. A simple majority vote is needed in order to approve a replacement. [20]

Term Limits

The Ohio legislature is one of 15 state legislatures with term limits. Voters enacted the Ohio Term Limits Act in 1992. That initiative said that Ohio representatives are subject to term limits of no more than four two-year terms, or a total of eight years. [21]

The first year that term limits were enacted was in 1992, and the first year that term limits impacted the ability of incumbents to run for office was in 2000.

Committees: role and list of current committees

Committees

Every state legislature and state legislative chamber in the country contains several legislative committees. These committees are responsible for studying, amending, and voting on legislation before it reaches the floor of a chamber for a full vote. The different types of committees include standing committees, select or special, and joint.

  • Standing committees are generally permanent committees, the names of which sometimes change from session to session.
  • Select or special committees are temporary committees formed to deal with specific issues such as recent legislation, major public policy or proposals, or investigations.
  • Joint committees are committees that feature members of both chambers of a legislature.

Ballotpedia covers standing and joint committees. The Ohio House of Representatives has 21 standing committees:

The state of Ohio has 99 state House districts. Each district elects one representative.

Use the interactive map below to find your district.

Redistricting

In 37 states, legislatures are primarily responsible for drawing congressional district lines. Seven states have only one congressional district each, rendering congressional redistricting unnecessary. Four states employ independent commissions to draw the district maps. In two states, politician commissions draw congressional district lines.

State legislative district lines are primarily the province of the state legislatures themselves in 37 states. In seven states, politician commissions draw state legislative district lines. In the remaining six states, independent commissions draw the lines. [22]

Congressional redistricting procedures in Ohio

On May 8, 2018, voters in Ohio approved a constitutional amendment establishing new procedures for congressional redistricting. Beginning with the 2020 redistricting cycle, the following provisions were set to take effect: [23] [24]

  • Following completion of the United States Census, state legislators can adopt a new congressional district map if three-fifths of the legislature’s total membership vote to approve, including one-half of the minority party members. This map would apply for 10 years.
  • If the legislature proves unable to adopt a new map, a commission will be formed to adopt a map. That commission will include the governor, state auditor, secretary of state, and four legislators, two of whom must come from the legislature’s minority party. A majority of the commission’s members, including two members belonging to the minority party, must agree on a map. The map would apply for 10 years.
  • If the commission proves unable to adopt a map, state legislators will be given a second chance to adopt a map. The map would have to be approved by three-fifths of the legislature’s total membership, including one-third of the minority party’s members. The map would apply for 10 years.
  • If the legislature fails a second time, the majority party of the legislature, without support from the minority party, can adopt a map that would apply for four years.

Maps drawn by the legislature can be vetoed by the governor or a veto referendum campaign. The amendment stipulates that 65 of Ohio’s counties cannot be split during redistricting (18 can be split once, and the state’s five most populous counties can be split twice). [23] [24]

State legislative redistricting procedures in Ohio

On November 3, 2015, voters in Ohio approved a constitutional amendment to create a bipartisan state legislative redistricting commission. The commission comprises seven members: the governor, state auditor, secretary of state, one person appointed by the speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives, one person appointed by the House leader of the largest political party of which the speaker is not a member, one person appointed by the President of the Ohio State Senate, and one person appointed by the Senate leader of the largest political party of which the president is not a member. [25] [26]

Maps drawn by the commission are valid for 10 years if at least two commissioners from each major political party vote for them. Should the maps be passed along strictly partisan lines, the maps are valid for four years. [25] [26]

A six-member advisory commission is also involved in the congressional and state legislative redistricting processes. The majority leaders of the Ohio House of Representatives and the Ohio State Senate each appoint three members, “at least one of whom must be from a different party, and at least one of whom must not be a legislator.” [27]

All legislative districts are required to be compact and made of “contiguous territory.” Also, the “boundary of each district [must] be a single nonintersecting continuous line.” The amendment forbids district plans from favoring or disfavoring either political party. [25] [26]

2010 census

Ohio received its 2010 local census data in early March 2011. Although the state population showed net growth, Ohio’s large cities recorded significant population loss. Of the state’s five largest cities, only Columbus showed population growth. Cleveland suffered the sharpest decline, losing 17.1% of its population. [28]

The Ohio Legislative Task Force on Redistricting, Reapportionment, and Demographic Research assisted the General Assembly and Ohio Apportionment Board in drafting new maps. Four of the five members of the Board were Republicans. By a vote of 4-1 they gave final approval to a new map on September 28, 2011 – two days after posting them online. The lone Democrat on the Board, Rep. Armond Budish, opposed the map, saying it “quarantines” Democrats in 1/3 of the legislative districts. [29]

On January 4, 2012, Democrats filed suit against the legislative maps, saying they violated constitutional requirements for compactness and preservation of county and municipal boundaries. The Ohio Supreme Court took the case but, due to the time factor, ruled the new maps would stand for the 2012 elections, with possible revisions to apply starting in 2014. [30]


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SOURCE: SOURCE: NEF6.COM
http://ballotpedia.org/Ohio_House_of_Representatives

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